Improv Is Easy!

(Then why is it so hard?)

Posts tagged auditions

55 notes

Unsolicited Advice

larhunter:

The day the new teams are announced, there’s a lot of space taken up on the web for the newly cast: congratulations and what not. But nothing ever really gets said to the people who are cut. I’ve been thinking a lot about that today, so I decided to offer some advice to those people.

1) Feel your feelings
When I was cut from Harold Night, I was devastated. I felt like my greatest dream had been taken from me. I was really sad. Then I was really angry. The important thing to remember is that it’s okay to be angry or sad or whatever you’re feeling. And it’s also okay if you want to take a break from the scene. Give yourself some time to process.

2) Don’t panic
After the initial shock wears off, you are probably going to want to talk to someone, a teacher or the AD, and get a full postmortem on why you were cut. I do not recommend this. It will only send you into a deeper tailspin. Yes, it’s possible that you could get back on a team and yes, the AD/teacher might have some advice, but you know, deep down, what you could work on. Don’t weigh yourself down with someone else’s criticism. It’ll just send you into your head.

3) Pretend this is it
Ask yourself, “if I never got back on a team, what would I do?” Whatever the answer is, that’s probably the best thing you can do right now. If you love improv, you’ll find a way to keep doing it. If you decide you’re done, that’s okay too. Remember, “you are what you love, not what loves you.”

4) You are a talented and worthy person
Otherwise you’d have never been cast. Remember this. It is true.

To those who were cast, congrats. To those who were cut, I got your back.

Filed under improv comedy audition auditions cut

10 notes

feitelogram asked:

Hey Kirk, a fan of what you are doing here. Here’s one I think is pertinent to the community: How do you deal with rejection, being cut, not getting on a team or in a class in this community? Often times with auditioning for scripted stuff, I have the mentality of “Well at least they don’t know me” or “I’m not what they’re looking for” and can let it go. But when the people around you deciding are your teachers and friends it can be more challenging to face. Any advice?

Thanks for being a fan and writing in!
Here’s an older post about dealing with rejection. This other one has Muppets.
Neil Gaiman’s advice might also help: 1) Swear. 2) Shrug. 3) Write the next thing.
Rejection always sucks. The thing to remember is that it’s not personal… even when you know the people involved.
Improv is this weird group effort, and they’re looking for several pieces of a puzzle that appear to fit properly at that moment in time. Even if they know you, sometimes you aren’t the person in the ensemble that they need. Sometimes they’re right. Sometimes they’re wrong.
It’s a crazy difficult task. Something that might help is looking at things from the decision-makers’ point of view. After talking to one of them after recent auditions, he admitted it was incredibly difficult - basically, everyone was really good, and they’re all friends and students of his, and it’s difficult to have to reject so many people who are still really good, it’s just that some others had an extra little oomph.
Feeling empathic and understanding where they’re coming from helped me out; it might do the same for you.
Either way, any rejection doesn’t end your journey. Keep on truckin’ and make the next thing.
Got your back. 
Ask improv-is-easy a question!
Hey Kirk, a fan of what you are doing here. Here’s one I think is pertinent to the community: How do you deal with rejection, being cut, not getting on a team or in a class in this community? Often times with auditioning for scripted stuff, I have the mentality of “Well at least they don’t know me” or “I’m not what they’re looking for” and can let it go. But when the people around you deciding are your teachers and friends it can be more challenging to face. Any advice?

Thanks for being a fan and writing in!

Here’s an older post about dealing with rejection. This other one has Muppets.

Neil Gaiman’s advice might also help: 1) Swear. 2) Shrug. 3) Write the next thing.

Rejection always sucks. The thing to remember is that it’s not personal… even when you know the people involved.

Improv is this weird group effort, and they’re looking for several pieces of a puzzle that appear to fit properly at that moment in time. Even if they know you, sometimes you aren’t the person in the ensemble that they need. Sometimes they’re right. Sometimes they’re wrong.

It’s a crazy difficult task. Something that might help is looking at things from the decision-makers’ point of view. After talking to one of them after recent auditions, he admitted it was incredibly difficult - basically, everyone was really good, and they’re all friends and students of his, and it’s difficult to have to reject so many people who are still really good, it’s just that some others had an extra little oomph.

Feeling empathic and understanding where they’re coming from helped me out; it might do the same for you.

Either way, any rejection doesn’t end your journey. Keep on truckin’ and make the next thing.

Got your back. 

Ask improv-is-easy a question!

Filed under improv rejection audition auditions

12 notes

larhunter:

post-audition tip:
I took an audition class once and the teacher recommended you schedule it so that right after the audition you have somewhere to be, like an appointment or a date.  That way when you get out your thoughts go towards what you’re about to do and you don’t brood as much about the audition.

larhunter:

post-audition tip:

I took an audition class once and the teacher recommended you schedule it so that right after the audition you have somewhere to be, like an appointment or a date.  That way when you get out your thoughts go towards what you’re about to do and you don’t brood as much about the audition.

(Source: improv-is-easy)

Filed under Auditions Improv Comedy UCB Harold

12 notes

Great question, Nicole!
Unfortunately, I don’t have the world’s greatest answer, so I’m gonna make this a photo post and end with a question mark so other people can chime in if they’re so inclined.
Dealing with nerves is unique to every person, and so you gotta do what puts yourself in the best mindset beforehand, like following your pre- and post-show rituals. If this means wearing certain clothes or eating a certain something or going to the bathroom (gross!) before the audition, do it up!
Similarly, everyone’s got their own methods of self-destruction. Getting out of our own way, well… it depends. The easiest is to not worry about yourself or what you’re gonna do, but what your partner’s up to, and how to give ‘em what they want in a way that you find fun and funny.
And if you don’t know what they want, then just react in a way that is believable but also fun and funny for you.
Anyway, here’s some advice, basic as it might be…
BEFORE THE AUDITION…
For Del’s sake, please don’t worry about it too much beforehand. It’s improv, you can’t prepare or imagine what’s gonna happen. Seriously, don’t worry about it.
Show up early, but not TOO early or you’ll just be in your head the entire time.
Chat it up with your group, so at least you’re not afraid to look ‘em in the eye during showtime.
DURING THE AUDITION…
Think of it as your chance to do a scene you’ve always wanted to do and to try something you’ve always wanted to try and to do something fun.
Don’t focus on making the judges laugh. Focus on your partner and yourself.
After your first scene, drop it and don’t stew. Pay attention to the present.
If you’re on the backline and someone does something funny, don’t be afraid to laugh.
AFTER THE AUDITION…
Feel free to share stories with your friends. Bonding helps.
Don’t beat yourself up. They were just two scenes.
Find something distracting to do on the evening when they make callback announcements, so you’re not sitting by the computer or phone hating yourself.
Anyone else?

Great question, Nicole!

Unfortunately, I don’t have the world’s greatest answer, so I’m gonna make this a photo post and end with a question mark so other people can chime in if they’re so inclined.

Dealing with nerves is unique to every person, and so you gotta do what puts yourself in the best mindset beforehand, like following your pre- and post-show rituals. If this means wearing certain clothes or eating a certain something or going to the bathroom (gross!) before the audition, do it up!

Similarly, everyone’s got their own methods of self-destruction. Getting out of our own way, well… it depends. The easiest is to not worry about yourself or what you’re gonna do, but what your partner’s up to, and how to give ‘em what they want in a way that you find fun and funny.

And if you don’t know what they want, then just react in a way that is believable but also fun and funny for you.

Anyway, here’s some advice, basic as it might be…

BEFORE THE AUDITION…

  • For Del’s sake, please don’t worry about it too much beforehand. It’s improv, you can’t prepare or imagine what’s gonna happen. Seriously, don’t worry about it.
  • Show up early, but not TOO early or you’ll just be in your head the entire time.
  • Chat it up with your group, so at least you’re not afraid to look ‘em in the eye during showtime.

DURING THE AUDITION…

  • Think of it as your chance to do a scene you’ve always wanted to do and to try something you’ve always wanted to try and to do something fun.
  • Don’t focus on making the judges laugh. Focus on your partner and yourself.
  • After your first scene, drop it and don’t stew. Pay attention to the present.
  • If you’re on the backline and someone does something funny, don’t be afraid to laugh.

AFTER THE AUDITION…

  • Feel free to share stories with your friends. Bonding helps.
  • Don’t beat yourself up. They were just two scenes.
  • Find something distracting to do on the evening when they make callback announcements, so you’re not sitting by the computer or phone hating yourself.

Anyone else?

Filed under Improv UCB Auditions Harold