Improv Is Easy!

(Then why is it so hard?)

9 notes

Aimee had a very real, very important response to that Del quote I posted earlier.
With this blog (like at Hogwarts), help will always be given to those who ask for it.
Chris Scott wrote something in response to a question about reacting big while reacting real, and it’s worth reblogging now.
chrisreblogs:

First an aside: Sometimes I think the note “play more aggressively/fearlessly” is given to players who play subtler and quieter but get lost behind larger players, especially on teams. (I am not saying this is the case here. Just an observation I feel like talking about.) I think this is shame. Often less aggressive players are told to match the big energy. Less often aggressive players are told to match “calmer” players. But scenes often go to the bold… which means others are sometimes walked/talked over. So a thought to the more aggressive players out there: Listen to both words and energy. Change up YOUR play at times to match others.

I agree with Chris. It’s the improviser’s job to sell the scene as best and believable as they can. Some performers oversell, some undersell. Those are their comfort zones. I’m all about breaking out of comfort zones, though. Big performers and small performers can take something from the other and meet somewhere in the middle.
One more little thing: remember you’re acting on a stage and not in front of a camera, so you have to act slightly bigger/louder so that the audience can see and hear everything you do.
If the audience misses it, they can’t feel it, and that’d be a shame.
Hope this helps, Aimee… and I also hope this is formatted correctly/has the right picture. Tumblr is being weird today (among other things, it’s bolding everything… including this paragraph! TUMBLR IS BEING OVER-EMOTIONAL.)

Aimee had a very real, very important response to that Del quote I posted earlier.

With this blog (like at Hogwarts), help will always be given to those who ask for it.

Chris Scott wrote something in response to a question about reacting big while reacting real, and it’s worth reblogging now.

chrisreblogs:

First an aside: Sometimes I think the note “play more aggressively/fearlessly” is given to players who play subtler and quieter but get lost behind larger players, especially on teams. (I am not saying this is the case here. Just an observation I feel like talking about.) I think this is shame. Often less aggressive players are told to match the big energy. Less often aggressive players are told to match “calmer” players. But scenes often go to the bold… which means others are sometimes walked/talked over. So a thought to the more aggressive players out there: Listen to both words and energy. Change up YOUR play at times to match others.

I agree with Chris. It’s the improviser’s job to sell the scene as best and believable as they can. Some performers oversell, some undersell. Those are their comfort zones. I’m all about breaking out of comfort zones, though. Big performers and small performers can take something from the other and meet somewhere in the middle.

One more little thing: remember you’re acting on a stage and not in front of a camera, so you have to act slightly bigger/louder so that the audience can see and hear everything you do.

If the audience misses it, they can’t feel it, and that’d be a shame.

Hope this helps, Aimee… and I also hope this is formatted correctly/has the right picture. Tumblr is being weird today (among other things, it’s bolding everything… including this paragraph! TUMBLR IS BEING OVER-EMOTIONAL.)

  1. nicclee reblogged this from improv-is-easy and added:
    Hooray! Someone else who feels like their subtle improv play is not appreciated. I love Chris’ note because I feel like...
  2. chrisreblogs reblogged this from improv-is-easy and added:
    (I feel slightly weird reblogging something that quotes me but this topic is close to my heart.) While coaching last...
  3. improv-is-easy posted this